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Khadi

  • History of the fabric that shaped India's freedom struggle – Khadi

    “For every minute I spin, there is in me the consciousness that I am adding to the nation’s wealth.” – Mahatma Gandhi.

    What is khadi? How is it important to us as Indians? These are just a few questions which we will be answering in this blogpost. Let us first start with the basic question. What is Khadi? Well, Khaadi is one of the most ancient fabrics in the world. Khadi or khaddar, as it is also known, is a hand spun and hand woven cloth which is mainly made from cotton on a spinning wheel known as a charkha.

    However, if we were to delve deeper, we will realize that it’s not just a fabric, it is an entire movement which laid the foundation for the freedom struggle as we know it today. The Khadi movement was started by The Father Of The Nation himself as a means to an end. The movement itself aimed at boycotting all the foreign goods and encouraging the use of Indian products. Spinning of the charkha to produce khadi had a huge significance because it promoted self-employment and the reliability and dependency on one’s own self was improved. Indians boycotted the use of industry made clothes from Britain and instead chose to wear Indian made khadi clothes, which in turn made khadi an integral piece of the Swadesi movement.

    Image Credit - Pixabay Image Credit - Pixabay

    Whenever you wear khadi, you are helping other Indians and fulfilling your social responsibility of helping all the people who are directly or indirectly involved in the manufacture of the khadi fabric. Khadi is also an eco-friendly fabric which decomposes in the earth in around six months unlike the other synthetic fabrics. Another benefit of wearing khadi over synthetic clothing is that you are exposing your skin to just organic stuff and there are no health hazards involved. Khadi helps your skin to breathe. When you wear khadi, you are also respecting the spirit of patriotism attached to this fabric.

    We however usually feel that khadi, nowadays, is more expensive than the regular fabric. This is a flawed argument because it is not the right perspective to look through. Comparing an exclusive, hand crafted product to the mass produced machine made products should be a crime upon itself.

    A nation will not prosper if its handicrafts and industries are not developed. Importing everything from outside and not focusing on helping the local products and industries grow will only create a dependent and lazy nation.

    Go on, flaunt you style with Khadi! Make the statement.

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