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  • Traditional Thanjavur Paintings: Buy It At Affordable Prices

    With a rich lineage dating back to 1600 AD, the stunning Thanjavur paintings originated during the reign of Vijayanagara Rayas of the Nayakas. Distinct for its gold coating on sober yet vibrant colors, this painting style from South India was the endemic of Thanjavur or Tanjore and later spread across the nation. This “Geographical indication”, an acknowledgement of the Government of India is painted on canvas framed by wood and mostly feature deities along with mythological characters, culture, dance form, female figurine etc. Poompuhar has its stores all over India and these paintings are among the most popular products that they offer.

    The richness of the paintings

    The distinct characteristics of these paintings are their rich, vivid yet flat colors and the iconic composition which is complemented by the glistening gold foils. The additional decorations are done by glass beads on gesso work and in some cases, overlays with the semi-precious or rarely precious stones. Poompuhar makes sure that the paintings are infused with the European, Maratha, Deccan, Vijaynagar, British and European touch.

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    What these paintings contain

    As mentioned above, the pictures are used mostly for devotional purposes as they feature Hindu deities, saints and religious personalities. The main figure remains the centerpiece in each picture flanked by various subjects, subsidiary figures and themes. The episodes from religious texts like Puranas are also depicted through these paintings.

    Deities like Ganesha, Lakshmi, Perumal, Krishna, Gajalakshmi, Saraswathy, Balaji, Adishankara are quite commonly found in these paintings. If religious figures are not your preference, then you can go for the paintings depicting the Hindu culture such as the female figure with fruit plate on hand and the lady in the posture of Bharatnatyam.

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    Decorate Thanjavur Paintings As Souvenirs

    In various religious ceremonies, the Thanjavur or Tanjore Paintings are used for worshipping and with their breathtakingly rich colors, they can be wonderful souvenirs to preserve the south Indian culture. Art enthusiasts would love to collect the special collector’s edition which is also offered by Poompuhar. Not only for worship corners, but also for wall hangings, these pictures will work great.

    According to various sizes, ranging from 8 x 10 inches to 48 x 72 inch, the price of these painting varies. You can choose pictures according to your preference or wall space. The price range starts from INR 3000 for the smallest size of 8 x 10 inch while the largest size of 48 x 72 inch comes at INR 360,000. With their rich gold work and adornment with semi precious and precious jewels, the weight is not much and the price is affordable too unlike other stores.

    The Thanjavur paintings have gone through a lot of ups and downs and Poompuhar has been incorporating with the rich Vijaynagar School of painting to preserve this century old art style. The Tirupati influenced paintings have terracotta paintings, brass repousse and painting on paper –They are the most popular style among the other influences.

    Poompuhar not only celebrates the ancient artwork of Thanjavur but also embraces the contemporary fusion in Thanjavur paintings, for example, the lady with plate of fruit painted by western naturalist painter Raja Ravi Varma.

  • Amazing and easy DIY wall painting ideas

    Looking for some simple and awesome DIY ideas to decorate your plain walls? There are a lot of interesting and creative ways to do that even on an extremely tight budget!

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    1. A piece of fabric in the frame

    If you are lucky to have several old empty frames, you can use them in your astounding DIY project immediately! Take a frame, put some interesting fabric sample inside, and it is ready! Instead of fabric, you can use wallpapers with different prints.

    1. A colorful honeycomb

    This type of an art object may be applied to the whole wall of any size. The best to make it look awesome in to combine the neighboring shades leaving few ones just blank.

    1. Glow in the dark paint

    If there is any possibility for you to make such a paint available that glows in the darkness, then a lot of experimentation will be needed. With such tool, starry night with a moon won’t be a problem anymore! This type of a paint is easily available in local shops and online stores.

    1. Paper butterflies and other creatures

    A lot of creative people prefer working with paper as it is extremely versatile and eco-friendly material. For this incredible cheap project, you should cut a number of butterflies from colorful paper and attach them to the wall directly with glue or to a special frame with a attached canvas. This DIY idea doesn’t require any painting skills but at the same time, there is no limit to creativity and colors.

    1. Stylish polka dots

    Classy polka dots don't only look awesome on your T-shirts or dresses, but also on the walls of your bedroom. They can be just painted with the help of a ready-made pattern or one can directly attach special sticky adhesive circles imitating various textures. If you use paint for this project, make sure that the circles look neat and really round.

    1. Amazing graffiti

    Graffiti once appeared in the streets of big cities and for a long time, people didn't accept it as an art. Fortunately, now graffiti can be on the walls of your living room or a loft. And of course, it will look fantastic! This DIY idea looks quite affordable, but it may require experience, patience and certain skills.

  • Gond Art Tribal Vibes

    Gond painting is a tribal art form practised by one of the biggest tribes in India of the same name. The word Gond is derived from an expression in a Dravidian language known as Kond, meaning the green mountain. Though Gond art is perceived as exclusive to Madhya Pradesh, it is also practised in areas such as Maharashtra, Odisha, Chattisgarh and Andhra Pradesh. Gond art is ancient-The Gond people have lived in India for nearly one and a half millennia have practised this art form for the entire duration of their existence. Some sources suggest that the art form itself may be much older as the gonds could have simply imitated cave paintings made by their ancestors in the Mesolithic era.

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    The gonds believe that all naturally occurring objects, such as trees, rivers, rocks or hills are inhabited by a divine entity and that they are consequently sacred. The Gond, therefore, make paintings of them as a way of showing reverence and respect. Viewed this way, the Gond art form is a unique but accurate example of the closeness between man and his natural environment.

    Besides nature, Gond artists get inspiration from traditional Indian mythology and folklore. Some painters focus on scenes from daily life and abstract ideas such as dreams, imaginations and emotion. The style is often categorised as a form of line art. When making paintings, Gond artists draw inner and outer lines with great care to achieve a level of perfection and detail that is bound to draw the user's attention. Dashes and dots are utilised to add a greater sense of motion and detail. Artists utilise vivid colours such as yellow, red and blue on and white. Dyes are obtained from plant sap, animal manure, coloured soil, leaves and charcoal. Brown and yellow are derived from a type of locally available sand.

    Gond art was typically applied as a finishing for newly built houses. But starting in 1980, talented painters transformed this ancient style with a new narrative and figurative ideas using various modern media such as ink, acrylics, animated film and silkscreen prints. Rich in humour, colour and mystery, Gond paintings effectively make use of modern media to evoke the primordial psyche.

  • 10 Amazing Facts about Madhubani Paintings

    Mithila, more commonly known as Madhubani painting is a style of art that was developed by the women of several communities in the Mithila regions of Nepal and India. Its first known appearance was in Bihar, a village in Mithila. It was and still is popular throughout the region. Though it was initially a style of wall art, artisans have transferred it to canvas and paper in recent times. The instances of this art form that are produced on paper and canvas are more popularly known as Madhubani art.

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    Interesting facts –

    Madhubani art is highly resourceful. Paint is made from the paste of ground rice. Artists use their fingers, matchsticks, pen nibs and twigs to apply colours onto the canvas.

    It’s environmentally friendly. Only natural dyes are used for the paints. Among other materials, Madhubani artists will typically use soot, charcoal or lamp black for black, indigo for blue, sandalwood for red and turmeric extracts for yellow.

    Madhubani art has five individual styles, namely - Kachni, Kohbar, Bharni, Godna and Tantrik. The Tantrik and Kachni styles were originally practised by the upper caste women of Kayashth and Brahman. However, modern Madhubani art has transcended these boundaries and there is hardly any distinction by caste on this art form.

    Madhubani art is a geographically unique form of art. These paintings were unknown to the world until a British officer, William G archer discovered them in 1934.

    Madhubani saves nature. In 2012, Madhubani artists decorated over 100 trees to protect a forest from encroachment. The strategy worked! The spiritual and religious symbols painted onto the trees instilled a sense of respect and reverence for nature and spirituality into the locals.

    Madhubani art today draws a strong following from art enthusiasts all over the world. Madhubani patterns have now been incorporated into mugs, mouse pads, cushion covers and bags.

    Madhubani art is really old. It’s a 2500-year-old folk art that dates back to the era of Ramayana when the king asked an artist to make a portrait of his daughter’s betrothal to Prince Rama.

    Madhubani paintings are created instinctively by artists. There is no sketching at all. This quality makes each feature unique.

    This art has exclusive galleries. There are art galleries dedicated entirely to Madhubani art all over the world. Besides Mithilasmita in Bengaluru, there is a Mithila museum in Japan that displays over 850 Madhubani art pieces.

    Madhubani artwork is made in accordance with a set theme. Artists use lines, pattern and symbolism to depict and emphasise cultural values such as religion.

  • The art of hand painting - Kalamkari

    The art of hand painting on cotton or silk fabrics which is famous as Kalamkari – is one of India’s artistic treasures, going back to the ancient Persian Empire and literally meaning “craftsmanship with pen”. It uses a tamarind pen and through the process of bleaching, painting, printing, sun drying and cleaning it creates the most beautiful and, sometimes, unusual patterns.

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    Involving a lot of hard work and difficult procedures, Kalamkari often depicts flowers, animals like the peacock or Hindu characters, allowing artists a unique process of storytelling that began ages ago, 3000 BC. It was during the Mughal Empire that this type of craftsmanship got its recognition and it was further spread around the World by the British in the 18th century.

    Involving 23 steps from the beginning until the finished product, the colours were chosen to paint the fabrics are usually earth-toned, with indigo, black, green or mustard as favourites. The dyes used to paint are also all natural, with no chemicals and obtained through the manipulation of such things as iron, pomegranate or bark.

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    Kalamkari exists in India in two different styles, Srikalahasti and Machilipatnam. The first one takes its inspiration from the Hindu mythology by describing religious stories. The second one has a more abstract design showing blocks with detailed handwork throughout. Recently two new styles appeared due to the preferences of the population in the two main Indian states using this art. The Andhra style has forts, palaces and temples in its designs and the Gujarat Kalamkari presents pictures of the Hindu or Buddhist gods, such as Lord Krishna, Lord Ganesha or Lord Buddha.

    In the past, due to the tedious and long method of producing a Kalamkari, this hand paint relic had become almost obsolete with people wanting access to cheaper products. Nevertheless, its primary use nowadays is, as in the old days, the sarees. Today, people can shop for a range of different kalamkari printed dresses like Kurtis, sarees or dupattas in beautiful patterns and colours. Kalamkari has proved to be a safe craft as it does not use harmful chemicals and rely on organic colours to create multi-coloured fabrics.

  • Famous Ancient Indian Traditional Art and Paintings

    India is a land of cultural diversity but we can always witness that all these differences only makes it more interesting. Ancient Indian folk art is a tradition in India and it has been practiced through various generations in many parts of the country. With time, art forms tend to adapted modern resources but there are still few unpretentious forms who have survived the test of time. Most of the Indian folk art forms illustrate religious stories about God and Goddesses, and yet they are different from each other. Traditionally natural colours, earth, charcoal and natural resources were used by artists to maintain the natural integrity of the art. Ancient antique paintings are portrayed on the cloth or canvas.  Below is the list of ancient Indian art forms appreciating their uniqueness and magnificence –

    Madhubani Art

    Madhubani art originated in Mithila region of Bihar in India, hence this art is also known as Mithila art. Madhubani art is found in the mural and geometric patterns describing religious folk stories, God, Goddesses, Indian flora, and fauna. In ancient times, this art was used by women to decorate their home walls. Madhubani can be painted using fingers, sticks, brushes, pointed pens and natural colors and dyes. This art is mostly used as a part of the ritual during Indian festivals and happy occasions like birth or marriage, Holi, Kali Puja, Durga Puja.

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    Gond

    The Gond art form is said to evolve from Madhya Pradesh region in India. It is called Gond based on the name of ‘The Gondi tribe’ who is known as the inventor of Gond art. This type of art also focuses on the mysteries of nature, plants, animals. This is a very lively art form characterized by its upbeat colour schemes and vibrant looks. Natural colours are prepared from soil, charcoal and cow dung and are used to create this art form.

    Miniature Paintings

    Indian Miniatures paintings date back to 17th century and evolved in Western Himalayas. The art items are painted in small size with elaborate expressions and are inspired by Persian art style during Mughal era. The artists used to describe history and war. The main characteristics of a miniature painting are the enlarged eyes, sharp nose, and thin waist with men in turbans.

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    Phat Art

    Phat art is a traditional art of Rajasthan with paintings of folk deities of Pabujai and Devnarayan. The painting describes the incidents related to lives of these deities. It is painted on canvas and the paintings are generally large in size. Painters use natural colours and dye to create this magnificent art form.

    Kalamkari

    Kalamkari art is a Hindi translation for ‘creating art with pen’. A kalamkari is an ancient form of hand painting painted on cotton or silk cloth using natural colours and a special type of tamarind pen. This art is popular in Andhra Pradesh in machilipatnam and Srikalahasti. Machilipatnam artists create block paintings and Srikalahasti artists create designs on fabrics using pens. Natural resources are used for preparing colours such as fruits, vegetables, leaves and so on. Most common objects of Kalamkari art are flowers, birds, peacocks and Hindu mythological stories. In this day and age, this art has excelled as a popular art to create Kalamkari sarees.

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    Tanjore Painting

    Tanjore paintings are a famous art form of South Indian culture and are native to Thanjavur region of Tamil Nadu.  These paintings depict the stories related to God, Goddesses and holy saints of Hindu religion. Vibrant colours, precious stones, and ornaments are used to create these paintings. This art form is the blend of Maratha, Deccan and European panache and it originated in India somewhere in the 16th century.

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    Cheriyal Scrolls

    Cheriyal Scrolls painting is an ancient art form similar to Nakashi art. In current times, this art is only created in Telangana and Hyderabad states in India. These cheriyal scrolls paintings use local motifs and stories from Indian mythology. These scrolls are more than fifty feet long and painted in panels to narrate the stories from Puranas and Indian epics. Primary colours are used to create the scrolls.

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    Bhil

    Bhil is a folk art created by one of the main tribes in India known as ‘Bhils’. They live in Madhya Pradesh, Rajasthan and Maharashtra region in India. Bhils are known as successors of Eklavya, the great archer from Mahabharata. Bhil paintings are mostly about nature and tribal lifestyle and are painted using bright natural colours.

    Kalighat Paintings

    Kalighat paintings are used by artists to raise their voice against social conditions and cause awareness. The art form is known to exist since the 19th century and was originated at Kalighat in West Bengal state in India. Initially, this art was focused to tell religious stories but in modern times it is used for social reforms.

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    Warli

    Warli is another tribal art form from the Gujarat and Maharashtra regions. The Warli tribe used to paint the walls to decorate their homes. This painting uses geometric patterns to describe life in a modest way. The art is created on gerue (red soil) base with bamboo sticks. Rice paste is used to paint the various life events like festivals, dancing, etc.

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    Saura

    Saura is a traditional tribal painting used by Saura tribe living in Odisha, Jharkhand, Madhya Pradesh and Maharashtra. These paintings describe the never-ending connection between nature and mankind. Saura paintings use natural colours made from neem leaves, herbs, and flowers. Saura art also uses geometric patterns like Warli however it is much bigger and extended form of painting.

  • Pithora Paintings: An ancient and sacred form of Wall Painting

    A painting holds a deep relevance in India and is always associated with traditions and history. Pithora paintings are more of a ritualistic form of wall painting made by tribes known as Rathwas and Bhilalas of central Gujarat region, 90 km from Vadodara, in a village called Tejgadh. These paintings draw essence and inspiration from the lives of these people. Pithora paintings are considered very auspicious as they are believed to bring peace, prosperity and happiness in home. Another interesting feature of these paintings is that it is not imitated or inspired from nature at all. Pithora paintings are usually seen on three inter walls of the houses in these places A horse or a bull is usually painted at the centre to signify God. The quality, although, of Pithora painting is crude, but it is this feature only that adds beauty to these paintings.

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    Pithora paintings find their roots in thousands of years old cave paintings of Gujarat. These paintings hold a deep social relevance and are the characteristic art tradition of Rathwa community. If you enter their houses you will find beautiful Pithora paintings always situated at the threshold, outside the first front wall or inside on the walls of the first room. The distinguishing feature of Pithora painting is a group of seven horses enclosed within a rectangular fence representing the seven hills that surround the geographical area. The wavy line depicts the river Narmada cuts in the painting. Three walls are selected for the painting, the front large central wall and the two on either side of it. The front or central wall (main wall) is very large, twice the size of each of the other selected sidewalls. These walls are first covered with two layers of cow dung paste and one layer of white chalk powder. Unmarried girls collect and bring these materials. This process is called as Leepna. The painters are called as lakhadas and do not belong to the family or house. The tribute and wish to be fulfilled is generally made to Baba Pithora (who is considered a deity there) before the start of painting. It takes days to prepare the final painting. The painting generally starts on Tuesday and ends by Wednesday. The two sidewalls are then painted with figures of minor deities and ancestors. The completion of the painting is celebrated with song, dance, feast and music. There are numerous different and wonderful designs and varieties of Pithora paintings with the smallest measuring one and a half feet and the largest 145 by 10 feet.

    Pithora painting has a variety of connotations and beliefs. Objects like farms, trees, fields, birds, sun and moon are depicted in their relative positions along with people and their ancestors. Even modern objects like railway tracks, aero planes, and computers also feature the paintings, thus making it a real depiction of the world of Rathwa tribe.

    Pithora painters even today have successfully managed to keep the essence and unique painting style still alive with changing environment.

  • THE DYING ART OF CHERIYAL SCROLLS

    Cheriyal is quiet village nearly a 100 odd kilometres from Hyderabad in the Warangal district of Telangana. This village with approximately 2000 residents and 600 plus houses is nothing different from any other village in any other part of India, until you visit the 4 households that have kept the dying art of Cheriyal scrolls alive today.

    The Cheriyal scrolls were renowned across India and the world for their unlettered form of story-telling. In fact these scrolls find mention in A Catalogue of the British Museum.Today this traditional art form has become limited only the village of Cheriyal.

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    The canvas scrolls are made on Khadi and are hand painted with unique colours made from natural sources. There are a few characteristics that make the Cheriyal scrolls and paintings instantly recognizable such as the predominance of the colour Red in the background and the iconology of placing prominent figures in appropriate order. These scrolls are painted in a narrative format like comic strips or a film roll depicting scenes from Indian mythology like Krishna Leela, Ramayan, Mahabharatha among other folklore from the region.

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    Tradition has it that these scrolls were used for educating the unlettered villagers and kept the local populace entertained at that time. The village poet or artist would use these scrolls as visual aid to tell people of these stories. Today, with the advent of TV, internet and magazines these scrolls have become a dying art and is just confined to the Cheriyal village. The artists have been forced to adapt and nowadays they paint smaller versions of the scrolls, sometimes limited to just one panel to depict single episodes from the stories.

    Another craft from Cheriyal that has continued to linger and survive is the contemporary Cheriyal dolls. These dolls are made of wood, sawdust and tamarind paste while the masks are made from dried coconut shells.

    Today, the government is doing all things possible to keep this tradition alive and theseCheriyal scrolls are regularly showcased in government run handicraft stores. While the Cheriyal scroll painting received Intellectual Property Rights Protection or Geographical Indication (GI) status in 2007, the families involved in this art form are anything but rich and now rely on education to equip their children for a better future.

    One such family is the husband-wife duo of Vanaja and Ganesh. Both Vanaja and Ganesh are government recognized artists and have made murals for the visit of dignitaries including that of President Pranab Mukherjee’s to Nagpur. They also travel to various locations across the country conducting workshops on Cheriyal scrolls for various state governments and helping spread awareness about this dying art form. The couple run a Cheriyal painting workshop for teaching the basic techniques of scroll making to the neighbourhood children with which they hope they can revive this dying art.

    There are many such artists in Tamil Nadu too who are keeping their culture and art alive, read about them here at: http://www.tnartisaan.com/

  • Tanjore Paintings/Thanjavur Paintings

    India is home to several art forms and paintings. Each type can easily boasts of a large fan base and has their own rich legacy and story to share. Each painting genre has its own set of uniqueness, heritage and lay out. One art form that can easily be labelled as one of the oldest yet famous form of painting, especially in south India is the Tanjore Painting.

    Tanjore paintings can be traced to the town of Thanjavur in present day Tamil Nadu. Over time its popularity and adoption spilled across the adjoining and geographically contiguous Tamil state.

     Let us look at the rich legacy of one of India’s finest painting forms.

    Tanjore paintings can be traced back to early 17th century. This period was dominated by the Nayakas of Thanjavur under the patronage of the Vijayanagara Rayas. They encouraged art—chiefly, classical dance and music—as well as literature, both in Telugu and Tamil. Additionally, they also significantly promoted paintings of chiefly Hindu religious subjects in temples. However, it can safely be surmised that Thanjavur painting, as we know it now, originated in the Maratha court of Thanjavur (1676 - 1855). The Government of India has recognized this as a geographical indication in 2007-08.

    So what makes Tanjore Paintings so distinct and unique?

    Tanjore paintings are characterized by vivid, flat and rich colors. Furthermore, their simple iconic composition, glittering gold foils overlaid on delicate but extensive gesso work add wonders to the main content of the painting. One can definitely overlook the inlay of glass beads and pieces or very rarely precious and semi-precious gems!

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    Tanjore paintings clearly reflect the influence of paintings style, particularly of Deccani, Vijayanagar, Maratha and even European or Company styles of painting.

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    This form of paintings is dominated by the depiction of Hindu gods, goddesses, and saints. Several instances of Jain, Sikh, Muslim, and even secular subjects have had the honor of being depicted in the heritage-rich Tanjore paintings.

    Words would not do justice to describe the beauty of Tanjore paintings in mere 26 alphabets. Yet, if a fair attempt was to me made, Tanjore paintings undoubtedly can be described as a perfect reflection of the rich and age old culture of southern India. It is an amalgamation of south India’s legacy, presented on canvas by the imagination and ingenuity of its greatest practitioners and patrons.

    You can grab the best deals on the finest Tanjore paintings on our website tnpoompuhar.org

  • Famous Indian painters who got international credit

    India is a land of arts. This is the country that has given birth to fantastic artists for years, generation after generation. Many claim that all those things were past and historic. However, in present day also, there are different artists in India, who have established themselves in the International world of art. Here are the top five such Indian artists:

    M F Hussain

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    He is a famous painter in India, also known as ‘Indian Picasso’. He is the most celebrated and internationally renowned artists of all times. Renowned in India, this artist gave birth to lots of the exclusive art, some of which has got recognition in the international platform too. his paintings are mostly narrative, with diverse themes. 

    SH Raza

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    Renowned old painter of India, S Raza has made a record to earn 16 crore for a single painting. Some of the top paintingsof his are in the form of Saurastra and La Terre. Most of his paintings were on lightening Indian philosophy in the abstract form in oil or acrylic. His talent was not confined to the country alone. Soon it spread to a broader horizon, making him an internationally famous painter.

    F N Souza

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    The famous painter is recognized by the world for his extraordinary pieces of work. Nearly 400 paintings by him were sold in the world market, among which the famous Birth image is the brightest star. It was sold at 11 crores in International market. The painter created a different generation among all the painters, with his live works. The great painter died in the year of 2002.

    Tyeb Mehta

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    A Padma Bhushan recipient,Tyeb Mehta hailed from the Bombay Progressive Artists' Group, which included F.N. Souza, S.H. Raza and M.F. Husain. Like them, he also embraced the modern and brusque style of painting. Some of the top works of him includethe Diagonal Series and triptych Celebration. The latter one earned him 14 crore INR.

    Ganesh Pyne

    He is another artist of International fame. His works like Assassin or Before the Chariots are some of the landmark creations from this artist. Most of his works were based on the light and darkness of life, created keeping the riot phase in mind.

    VS Gaitonde

    Gaitonde is a renowned painter of India, famous in all parts of the world. Each of his work shows the control he has on his paint brush. He was an epitome of the meditative Zen quality and this is reflected in his paintings as well.In fact, some artists regard him to be the best in the modern context of art and painting in modern India.

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