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Tag Archives: Indian art

  • Proof that Indian handicrafts are incredibly appreciated around the World

    Indian handicrafts are as unique as its ancient history and diverse culture. It will not be an exaggeration of the fact that Indian art has emerged as a saviour of nature, tradition and culture since the start of time. One of the recent examples can be of Madhubani art. This art was the reason to put an end to deforestation in Bihar area in 2012, which attracted many tourists by its colourful artwork.  This is how art and Indian culture are entangled to each other. The world is also now a supporter of the incredible Indian handicrafts and its popularity is increasing with each day.

    Poompuhar is also offering its humble contribution in promoting Indian handicraft on the national and international level. You can just go online and check out our latest collection and help us shop for interesting handicrafts.

    With all the modern inventions booming in the field of art and crafts, let us take some time to learn a little about our popular ancient incredible Indian handicraft crafts. Kashmir is popular for its papermache and walnut wood decorative handicraft. Walnut wood crafts are also famous in Kashmir which is generally based on animals. Eco-friendly tribal art in east India is very popular and they use wood, fibres, metal, stones and so on.

    Shop for this Cow - Click Here

    Western India offers a large variety of handicrafts such as Textile, Jewellery, carpets, woodwork, Quilts, Marble crafts, Terracotta items, meenakari items and others. South Indian states are known for exotic Bnidri art, statues made of brass or wood, leather work, coconut handicraft and so on. Tanjur paintings exquisitely depict stories and beliefs belonging to various religions such as  Hindu, Islam, Jainism, Christianity, Sikhism, and many more which display the real spirit of Indian culture.

    Indian art has become popular around the world due to the hard work of the artisans and their handicrafts products. These crafts are handmade, manually engraved and painted, carved and molded by talented artists which makes them unique as well as popular.

  • Evolution of Thanjavur Paintings

    Thanjavur paintings are a significant part of from Indian art and culture, named after its place of origin called Thanjavur in South India. It dates back to the 16th century during the Nayak and the Maratha reign.

    Thanjavur Painting Lady with Fruit Plate Shop For This Thanjavur Painting Lady with Fruit Plate - Click Here

    Exceptional characteristics of Thanjavur Paintings

    • Rich and intense colours
    • Iconic Jewellery details
    • Dreamy iconic masterpieces
    • Use of gold foils
    • Dense gesso craft
    • Glass beads inlay
    • Use of rare gems
    • Panel paintings on wood
    • Commonly portray religious texts from books and stories

    Thanjavur Painting Yasodha Krishna Shop for this Thanjavur Painting Yasodha Krishna - Click Here

    However, with time, the art of Thanjavur painting has also evolved and few of the common practices have also changed. We will discuss the changes that this art has experienced over the years. The ingredients of an authentic painting have transformed in current times as per the availability, price, and artists interests.

    Major Changes noticed during the evolution of this art –

    • The base of the paintings – Presently ply boards are been used commonly instead of the original base from the jackfruit tree
    • Colours – Chemical paints are used frequently as opposed to the natural colours made by the artists in previous times.
    • Paintings nowadays cover all kinds of subjects. Earlier, the themes used to be divine figures, deities etc.
    • Use of rare and precious gems and stones has been replaced by semi-precious gems

    Thanjavur paintings are still in style and inspire many modern-day artists. Tanjore or Thanjavur paintings are popular handicraft item in the markets around the galleries across the globe and make the best souvenirs. This art gives a new look to the house with its radiant work. These paintings have stood the test of times and bounced back to create their place across every households and professional venue.

    Shop for this Thanjavur Painting Mirror - Click Here Shop for this Thanjavur Painting Mirror - Click Here

    At Poompuhar we understand the value of a genuine art and try to offer our customers the best options. You can visit our online store for more options and deals.

  • Nataraja: The Embodiment of Cosmos

    Indian art has for long been ruled by religious motifs. From the ancient times to the current era every form of art has a special topmost place for the bearers of religion. Lord Shiva who is famous for his dance the ‘thandavam’, is as much an art lover as the artists love to depict him. He is popularly known as ‘Natraja’, which literally means the ‘raja’ (King) of ‘Natiyam’ (Dance). All the Indian temples and particularly those of South India  flaunt images of Shiva-the cosmic dancer in various forms of art, the most common being the celebrated bronzes that are the tiara to all the other items of display in many-a-museums.  Shiva - the destroyer is among the 3 triad of energy that form the very base of the Hindu faith.  Bharatanatyam, a classical Indian dance form native to the state of Tamil Nadu has most of its moves inspired from Shiva’s dance.

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    Nataraja Thandavam [Image Credits: Balu Velachery - Flickr]

    The bronze statue of Nataraja is encircled in a sphere of the cosmic fire. The image radiates innumerable signifiers and readers of art read them in myriad ways. One of the vastly discussed aspects is the constant creation and destruction of the universe. His four hands; the two upper ones and the lower have their specific significance. The lower left hand calls for spirituality and the contentment that generates when one gives up ones baser wants. The lower right hand encourages the followers to perform good deeds while the upper right hand bears a damru that depicts time as it slips away. The upper left hand holds fire a symbol of destruction; thus the left and right upper hands demonstrate the creation and passage of time through the damru while the fire depicts the anger and destruction Shiva encompasses if need be.

    The birth of the Nataraja bronzes is age-old but tracing the place and time of origin with 100% precision is nearly impossible. The farthest the archaeologists have wandered is the 11th century. The first image of Natraja was found at Thillai Nataraja Temple at Chidambaram, but the historians do not establish it as the place where it was first made. Chidambaram is though often cited as the birthplace of the Bronze Nataraja. Shiva, who is usually represented in the form of Lingam, is rarely sculpted with human-like characteristics, thus this bronze deity holds a special place in the hearts of his devotees.

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    Thillai Nataraja Temple, Chidambaram [Image Credits: Jean-Pierre Dalbéra - Flickr]

    It is not only the Indian subcontinent that holds this image high but across cultures and lands the Nataraja image has gained immense popularity and words of appreciation.  Fritjof Capra, a well known American Physicist relates the cycle of creation and destruction to all forms of matter. CERN, European Centre for Nuclear Research, Geneva also flaunts a very tall statue that was installed in 2004.

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    Nataraja statue at CERN, Geneva where the God Particle was discovered [Image Source: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:CERN_shiva.jpg]

    This bronze sculpture has lived at least through the Pallava, Chola, Pandava Dynasties till the present age and shall also continue to rule the Indian art for ages to come.

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    A bronze Nataraja statue sculpted by Poompuhar artisans of the 21st Century using the Chola bronze technique

     

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